beatricepauline

kaffekärlek och regnknaster

apoetreflects:

Everyone once, once only.  Just once and no more.
And we also once.  Never again.  But this having been
once, although only once, to have been of the earth,
seems irrevocable.

—Rainer Maria Rilke, from Duino Elegies & The Sonnets of Orpheus (Vintage International, Bilingual Edition, 2009), edited and translated by Stephen Mitchell

theenlightenedphilistine:

Sofonisba Anguissola, Bernardino Campi painting Sofonisba Anguissola, Late 1550s
Sofonisba’s clever self-portrait shows her assertion of her artistic genius in the face of partriarchal society.  One of the few female Renaissance artists, this work is a portrait of herself being painted by her teacher Bernardino Campi.  She was born to a noble family who took a keen interest in educating their daughters.  Conscious of her patriarchial society, Sofonisba is consciously collapsing the subject-object position.  A peculiar conflation of the subject and obeject that befell women artists, Sofonisba asserts herself as the artist (subject) but also a model for the male aritst (object) subverting a common situation, Sofonisba asserts her superiority by showing Campi relying on a mahlstick.  Additionally she renders Campi more realistically than he does her.  To further the point, Campi has painted her with a little more revealing neckline than she typically shows in her other self portraits.  Psychologically engaging, Sofonisba’s skill did not go unnoticed as she achieved international renown and was lauded by Vasari.  Because she could not study anatomy, Sofonisba used subjects that were available to her, but has advanced beyond simple self-portraits creating this complex work which creates a rapport with the viewer.
(image from Wikimedia)

theenlightenedphilistine:

Sofonisba Anguissola, Bernardino Campi painting Sofonisba Anguissola, Late 1550s

Sofonisba’s clever self-portrait shows her assertion of her artistic genius in the face of partriarchal society.  One of the few female Renaissance artists, this work is a portrait of herself being painted by her teacher Bernardino Campi.  She was born to a noble family who took a keen interest in educating their daughters.  Conscious of her patriarchial society, Sofonisba is consciously collapsing the subject-object position.  A peculiar conflation of the subject and obeject that befell women artists, Sofonisba asserts herself as the artist (subject) but also a model for the male aritst (object) subverting a common situation, Sofonisba asserts her superiority by showing Campi relying on a mahlstick.  Additionally she renders Campi more realistically than he does her.  To further the point, Campi has painted her with a little more revealing neckline than she typically shows in her other self portraits.  Psychologically engaging, Sofonisba’s skill did not go unnoticed as she achieved international renown and was lauded by Vasari.  Because she could not study anatomy, Sofonisba used subjects that were available to her, but has advanced beyond simple self-portraits creating this complex work which creates a rapport with the viewer.

(image from Wikimedia)